A blue catfish, invasive species

Blue Catfish - Invasive Species

Grade 3

This lesson focuses on two main ideas:

  • Solutions to a new environmental concern (the spread of invasive species)
  • Exploring why invasive species are harmful

 

Procedure

INTRODUCTION (15 minutes)

Read the introduction to students and review new vocabulary. Students will watch the “Maryland Farm and Harvest - Episode 601” video. After the video, have a discussion around the essential questions and thinking questions aligned to the topic and video. Discuss the career connections related to blue catfish and the Chesapeake Bay with students.

EXTENSION (15-30 minutes)

Complete extension activities with students, as you see fit.

ASSESSMENT (15 minutes)

Have students apply their newfound knowledge by completing a Summative CER on the lesson using evidence from the video and activities as support.

REFLECTION (10 minutes)

Have students complete a reflection.

Standards

NGSS and Maryland Environmental Literacy Standards

3-LS4-4. Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change

  • Science and Engineering Practices
    Engaging in Argument from Evidence

    Engaging in argument from evidence in 3–5 builds on K–2 experiences and progresses to critiquing the scientific explanations or solutions proposed by peers by citing relevant evidence about the natural and designed world(s).
    • Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem by citing relevant evidence about how it meets the criteria and constraints of the problem.

  • Disciplinary Core Ideas
    LS2.C: Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience
    • When the environment changes in ways that affect a place’s physical characteristics, temperature, or availability of resources, some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die. (secondary)

    LS4.D: Biodiversity and Humans
    • Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there.

  • Crosscutting Concepts
    Systems and System Models
    • A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions.

    Connections to Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science
    Interdependence of Engineering, Technology, and Science on Society and the Natural World
    • Knowledge of relevant scientific concepts and research findings is important in engineering.

Standard 1
Environmental Issue Investigation and Action:
Environmentally literate students investigate environmental issues in order to develop and implement local actions that protect, sustain, or restore the natural environment.


Summative CER

Option 1:

Construct an argument on ways we can reduce the number of blue catfish in the Chesapeake Bay. Use evidence and reasoning from the videos and activities to support your argument.

Option 2:

Student A claims that invasive species are good for environments. Student B claims that invasive species are harmful to environments. Evaluate these claims to determine which student’s claim is correct. Use evidence and reasoning from the videos and activities to support your choice.


Reflection Questions

  • Why are blue catfish harmful to us and the Chesapeake Bay?
  • What solutions exist that can help stop the growth of these blue catfish?
  • Why should people care about invasive species spreading to environments where they live?

Summative CER Rubric

Scoring Rubric Components No Response
Score Point 0
Not There Yet
Score Point 0.5
Beginning To
Score Point 0.75
Yes
Score Point 1.0
CLAIM The claim is missing. The claim is incorrect or irrelevant. The claim partially takes a position on the topic or issue addressed within the prompt. The claim takes an appropriate position on the topic or issue addressed within the prompt.
EVIDENCE There is no type of evidence in the response. The evidence is irrelevant or does not support the claim. The evidence partially supports the claim and demonstrates some understanding of the topic or text, using appropriate sources. The evidence supports the claim and demonstrates a strong understanding of the topic or text, using appropriate sources.
REASONING There is no use of words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and to clarify the relationship between the claim and evidence. Use of words, phrases and clauses fail to show or explain any relationship between the claim and evidence. Scientific words, phrases, and clauses used lack cohesion but partially clarify the relationship between the claim and evidence. Appropriate scientific words, phrases, and clauses are used to create cohesion and to clarify the relationship between the claim and evidence.


This learning resource is a production of Maryland Public Television/Thinkport, in partnership with the Maryland Agricultural Education Foundation.

Thinkport logo

MAEF logo

MAEF logo