Oyster farming on the Bay

Too Much Rain Hurts Oyster Farms

Grade 5

This lesson focuses on two main ideas:

  • The importance of oysters to our Bay and our economy
  • Differences between fresh water and salt water and which type of water oysters require

Procedure

INTRODUCTION (15 minutes)

Read introduction to students and review new vocabulary. Students will watch the “Maryland Farm and Harvest - Too Much Rain Hurts Oyster Farms” video. After the video, have a discussion around the essential questions and thinking questions aligned to the topic and video. Discuss the career connections related to oyster farming with students.

EXTENSION (15-30 minutes)

Complete extension activities with students, as you see fit.

ASSESSMENT (15 minutes)

Have students apply their newfound knowledge by completing a Summative CER on the lesson using evidence from the video and activities as support.

REFLECTION (10 minutes)

Have students complete a reflection.

Standards

NGSS and Maryland Environmental Literacy Standards

5-ESS2-2. Earth Systems
Describe and graph the amounts of salt water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.

  • Science and Engineering Practices
    Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking
    Mathematical and computational thinking in 3–5 builds on K–2 experiences and progresses to extending quantitative measurements to a variety of physical properties and using computation and mathematics to analyze data and compare alternative design solutions.
    • Describe and graph quantities such as area and volume to address scientific questions.
  • Disciplinary Core Ideas
    ESS2.C: The Roles of Water in Earth’s Surface Processes
    • Nearly all of Earth’s available water is in the ocean. Most fresh water is in glaciers or underground; only a tiny fraction is in streams, lakes, wetlands, and the atmosphere.
  • Crosscutting Concepts
    Scale, Proportion, and Quantity Processes
    • Standard units are used to measure and describe physical quantities such as weight and volume.

Standard 2
Human Dependence on Earth Systems and Natural Resources: Environmentally literate students construct and apply understanding of how Earth’s systems and natural resources support human existence.


Summative CER

Option 1:

Do oysters and other organisms of the Chesapeake Bay rely on salt water or fresh water for survival? Use evidence and reasoning from the videos and activities to support your argument.

Option 2:

Why is salt water important in the world? Why is fresh water also important? Use evidence and reasoning from the videos and activities to support your claims.


Reflection Questions

  • Why are oysters so important to us?
  • Why can rain be harmful to oyster farms?
  • What happens if we do not control the decline in oyster populations?

Summative CER Rubric

Scoring Rubric Components No Response
Score Point 0
Not There Yet
Score Point 0.5
Beginning To
Score Point 0.75
Yes
Score Point 1.0
CLAIM The claim is missing. The claim is incorrect or irrelevant. The claim partially takes a position on the topic or issue addressed within the prompt. The claim takes an appropriate position on the topic or issue addressed within the prompt.
EVIDENCE There is no type of evidence in the response. The evidence is irrelevant or does not support the claim. The evidence partially supports the claim and demonstrates some understanding of the topic or text, using appropriate sources. The evidence supports the claim and demonstrates a strong understanding of the topic or text, using appropriate sources.
REASONING There is no use of words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and to clarify the relationship between the claim and evidence. Use of words, phrases and clauses fail to show or explain any relationship between the claim and evidence. Scientific words, phrases, and clauses used lack cohesion but partially clarify the relationship between the claim and evidence. Appropriate scientific words, phrases, and clauses are used to create cohesion and to clarify the relationship between the claim and evidence.


This learning resource is a production of Maryland Public Television/Thinkport, in partnership with the Maryland Agricultural Education Foundation.