Crab traps on the dock of the Chesapeake Bay

Seasonal Harvesting in the Bay - Teacher's Guide

Grades 3

This lesson focuses on two main ideas:

  1. The historical and ongoing importance of oysters and crabs to the Chesapeake Bay and our region’s economy
  2. Different characteristics of the Chesapeake Bay that make it a special and unique watershed

 

Procedure

INTRODUCTION (15 minutes)

Read the introduction to students and review new vocabulary. Students will watch the “Water’s Edge: Black Watermen of the Chesapeake” video. After the video, have a discussion around the essential questions and thinking questions aligned to the topic and video. Discuss the career connections related to the Chesapeake Bay and blue crab harvesting with students.

EXTENSION (15-30 minutes)

Complete extension activities with students, as you see fit.

ASSESSMENT (15 minutes)

Have students apply their newfound knowledge by completing a Summative CER on the lesson using evidence from the video and activities as support.

REFLECTION (10 minutes)

Have students complete a reflection.

Standards

NGSS and Maryland Environmental Literacy Standards

3-ESS2-1 Earth's Systems
Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.

  • Science and Engineering Practices
    Analyzing and Interpreting Data
    Analyzing data in 3–5 builds on K–2 experiences and progresses to introducing quantitative approaches to collecting data and conducting multiple trials of qualitative observations. When possible and feasible, digital tools should be used.
    • Represent data in tables and various graphical displays (bar graphs and pictographs) to reveal patterns that indicate relationships.
  • Disciplinary Core Ideas
    ESS2.D: Weather and Climate
    • Scientists record patterns of the weather across different times and areas so that they can make predictions about what kind of weather might happen next.
  • Crosscutting Concepts
    Patterns
    • Patterns of change can be used to make predictions.

3-LS4-3 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

  • Science and Engineering Practices
    Engaging in Argument from Evidence
    Engaging in argument from evidence in 3–5 builds on K–2 experiences and progresses to critiquing the scientific explanations or solutions proposed by peers by citing relevant evidence about the natural and designed world(s).
    • Construct an argument with evidence.
  • Disciplinary Core Ideas
    LS4.C: Adaptation
    • For any particular environment, some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.
  • Crosscutting Concepts
    Cause and Effect
    • Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified and used to explain change.

Standard 2
Human Dependence on Earth Systems and Natural Resources:
Environmentally literate students construct and apply understanding of how Earth’s systems and natural resources support human existence.


Summative CER

Option 1:

Construct an argument around how weather and climate impact the seasonal harvesting of oysters and crabs in the Chesapeake Bay. Use evidence and reasoning from the videos and activities to support your argument.

Option 2:

How do you think African Americans who worked on the Chesapeake Bay used science to understand that they could harvest oysters in the winter, and fish and hunt from crabs during the summer? Use evidence and reasoning from the videos and activities to support your claims.


Reflection Questions

  • Why are oysters and crabs so important to us? How do they help the economy?
  • How do weather and climate conditions impact life on the Chesapeake Bay?
  • What did you learn about African Americans and their contributions to the history of the Chesapeake Bay?

Summative CER Rubric

No Response
Score Point 0
Not There Yet
Score Point 0.5
Beginning To
Score Point 0.75
Yes
Score Point 1.0
The claim is missing The claim is incorrect or irrelevant. The claim partially takes a position on the topic or issue addressed within the prompt. The claim takes an appropriate position on the topic or issue addressed within the prompt.
There is no type of evidence in the response The evidence is irrelevant or does not support the claim. The evidence partially supports the claim and demonstrates some understanding of the topic or text, using appropriate sources. The evidence supports the claim and demonstrates a strong understanding of the topic or text, using appropriate sources.
There is no use of words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and to clarify the relationship between the claim and evidence. Use of words, phrases and clauses fail to show or explain any relationship between the claim and evidence. Scientific words, phrases, and clauses used lack cohesion but partially clarify the relationship between the claim and evidence. Appropriate scientific words, phrases, and clauses are used to create cohesion and to clarify the relationship between the claim and evidence.


This learning resource is a production of Maryland Public Television/Thinkport.